MFOS Sound Lab Mini Synthesizer (Part 1)

At some point I was obsessed by the wish to build an analogue synthesizer. Excessive googling lead me to this Website:

http://www.musicfromouterspace.com/

Great site with lots of HQ schematics, board layouts, etc.

So, for some reason I found myself buying parts for the “Sound Lab Mini”. Being based in Germany, I bought most parts from http://www.musikding.de/ (pots, knobs, JFETS, …) and http://www.reichelt.de (resistors, opamps, caps, PCB raw material …). The MFOS website features a very fine board layout which can be transferred to an “Europlatine” (standardized PCB raw material measuring 16cm x 10 cm) via the direct toner method (http://thomaspfeifer.net/direct_toner_pcb.htm). A nice thing about the direct toner method is: you can also use it to craft beautiful front panels or print component labels on the no-copper side!

It was a very lengthy and tiresome build … but thanks to tidy handiwork (or plain luck) the synth wobbled perfectly, once completed.

Yeah, not that much creative and original work from my side … except: I modified the front panel to fit the aluminium housing that I intended the synth to reside in. If you are interested, here it is:

Here are some pics taken during the build:

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2 responses to “MFOS Sound Lab Mini Synthesizer (Part 1)

  1. Looks great! Did you have any trouble getting the copper images to print so that the pad holes were exactly 1/10 inch apart and 3/10 inch across? I saved the image and printed it, making sure that the print page setup was not scaling the image at all, but the pads are not exactly right so I can’t move on to make the pcb 😦

    • Hi. Not so much trouble. But I took special care. The PCB copper side image was supplied as a pixel image (a gif as far as I recall). Pixel images contain no absolute information of scale. So I opened InkScape (an open source vector graphics editor), created a blank A4 pdf page, inserted the picture and scaled it to the correct size (so the pads for the IC legs are 1/10 inch/2.54 mm apart). I also applied a smoothing filter to smooth out the magnified pixelated edges.

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